FIFTY LIFE QUESTIONS

WHAT KIND OF HOUSE DID I LIVE IN AS A CHILD?

I was born in and grew up in a two bedroom white bungalow house.  There was a full attic and basement, both unfinished.

I was the fourth child born, we were all two to two and a half years apart.   The bedroom my sisters and  I shared was the larger of the two and was furnished with two iron frame double beds,a chest of drawers, a dresser and two night stands.   We each had our name on the side of which drawers were ours.  It was six and a half years after I was born that my youngest sister came into our lives.

The bedrooms with a bathroom between them and a small linen closet was on one side of the house.  The other side was kitchen and breakfast nook with a swinging door to formal dining room and  an archway connecting the living room.

There was a one car garage behind our house but we didn’t have a car.  That came many years later.  My sister and I used to play house in  the garage.  We marked rooms with chalk and even pretended it was a two story flat with her upstairs and myself down.  We even drew in stairs along one side. Curtains were hung in the window and door window and we used wagons, boxes and anything we could find to use as furniture.

Our basement had a large coal burning furnace with took up most of the floor space.  In each corner opposite the furnace were two rooms, one the coal bin and the other a fruit cellar.  On the other side of the furnace was my dad’s workshop outfitted with all hand tools.  The stairs were in the middle and my mother’s washing machine was on  the other side.  During the winter months a clothes line was stretched from the wall by her washer to the wall between the coal bin and pantry.  I always thought the basement to  be a scarier place and would run up the stairs as if someone was chasing me.

The attic with windows on every side was my favorite place to be.  Everything was stored there, such as my mother’s wedding gown, other old clothing in a cedar chest and the big black trunk from my father’s homeland.  It was a place to escape to and dream.  There were old books, pictures, always something to find and nooks to explore.

Many years later the basement was made into a rec room after the furnace was replaced with gas heat.   Of course there was no need for the coal bin and that gave more space.  Mom had an automatic washer and dryer and in place of old furnace area there was a ping pong table.

But the attic stayed the same.  When it was time to move my mother out I revisited the attic  and found myself back in time exploring nooks and crannies, rediscovering the past.  My favorite place.

 

 

THEN AND NOW

REMEMBERING CHARLOTTE

Just yesterday my son lost his 12 year old Puggle  dog, named Charlotte.   Charlotte was not only a major part of his life but of our whole family.  He got Charlotte as an eight week old puppy and she bonded with him and he with her.

Charlotte loved to eat and could put away her food in record time.  If you left your food too close to edge of table she could put that away too.  She always knew when it was time to eat and let you know by pawing her food bowl making a lot of noise.

Charlotte loved to fetch tennis balls and could sniff out a tennis ball even when it was not clearly in sight.  She never missed retrieving the ball whether on land or tossed in the lake.

Charlotte even starred in a movie produced by her people-cousins.  This brought much laughter and joy to us all.

As Charlotte got older she would happily spend most of her day sleeping on the sofa, but always became alert before my son would get home.

To my son and his family I know how very heartbroken you are.  We  all feel the loss of Charlotte but can always remember the joy she brought into our lives.

May all the angels in heaven enjoy and love her as much as we all did.

 

 

FIFTY LIFE QUESTIONS

WHAT INVENTION IMPACTS MY LIFE THE MOST

There were different things at different times of my life.  When I was young television would be my answer.  Before TV we had favorite programs on the radio.  Us children would sit around our  large cabinet radio on Friday nights and listen to programs such as Inner Sanctum; The Whistler; and The Shadow.  Much like the TV series today we were left with cliff hanger endings till the next episode.

In the fifties when we got a ten inch TV screen within a large cabinet that took up the corner of our living room we gathered around this and watched our programs.  There were three channels, none came in clearly unless someone stood near the TV and had their hand on top.  My brilliant father solved this my making a long wire rod from floor to a right angle of rod touching the corner of the TV.  We enjoyed programs such as wrestling (every Friday night), Milton Berle, and I remember Mama.  My father made a bookcase out of our radio cabinet.

As I got older my Kenmore sewing machine, with embroidery stitch options, and versatile zigzag stitch would be my answer.  I sewed my clothes, my children’s clothes, my husband sport coats and even got into drafting my own patterns and some designing.  I had such a passion and excitement to create.  I still have this sewing machine today though it is retired,  a great reminder of my creativity.

Today I would answer my robots.  My robots make my life easier.  You would recognize them under different names.  Automatic washing machine and dryer, dishwasher, self defrost freezer and ice maker, my oven that can delay start and shut off by setting a button.  I don’t own a Roomba as I have all hardwood floors, but I am sure if my home were carpeted that would be another robot I would have.

Tomorrows inventions will be built upon today’s inventions as today’s were built on  yesterdays inventions.  They all probably go back to the invention of the wheel.

THEN AND NOW

GOOD ADVICE

As I have this ongoing project of decluttering my closets and drawers I came across a paper of MURPHY’S LAW.  During this season of bussiness and haste I want to share some of the Murphy’s Law quotes.

Murphy was an optimist.

“There’s never time to do it right, but there’s time to do it over.”                                         “The light at the end of the tunnel is the headlight of an oncoming train.”                       “If everything seems to be going well, you obviously don’t know what the hell is going on.”                                                                                                                                          “Never argue with a fool, people might not know the difference.”                                       “A short cut is the longest distance between two points.”                                                     “Where you stand on an issue depends on where you sit.”                                                   “If you’re feeling good, don’t worry, you’ll get over it'”                                                          “In case of doubt make it sound convincing.”                                                                           “Never sleep with anyone crazier than yourself.”                                                                   Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong.”                                                                           “If more “one person is responsible for a miscalculation, no one will be at fault.”         And my favorite, “Everyone should believe in something–I believe I’ll have another drink.”

Take the time  to enjoy this beautiful Christmas season and slow down.

 

THE TIME OF OUR LIFE

We get so caught up with life that we are often wishing it away.    How many times do we say “I can’t wait”.

 I get a  can’t wait til I’m done with school, I can’t wait til I can vote, drink, live on my own, marry, start a family.   When we attain those we then can’t wait for our children to sleep thru the night, are potty trained, start school, finish school, move out.

Why do we have this rush thru life, what drives us to get to the next step.

‘We can learn a lot from young children who live for each moment.  As I reflect on the eve of my oldest son’s birthday, I remember a nice summer day, he was nine or ten, he filled his water gun, took his jar of bubbles and sat under a birch tree, sending an arc of bubbles in the air and practiced his aim with his water gun.  I remember thinking what fun he’s having, no worries, just living in the moment.  

Life cannot always be this simple, but we should try our hardest to enjoy our happy moments and store them away in our minds to revisit when we rushed through all the times we didn’t have that luxury.

Son, I wish you a very happy birthday, and remember your moment under the birch tree when nothing else mattered but seeing how well your aim was.

 

 

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

My Blog is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you’ll get until you “byte” into it.

How many of you found your dog or cat’s belly button?  How many of you even tried?

Did you know that each pup in a litter has it’s own placenta, unless they are identical, then they share one placenta,